Spotted Wing Drosophila Update #1

Thursday, July 26, 2018


Spotted wing Drosophila have been found from monitoring being done in Nova Scotia. The first female was identified from traps in an unmanaged highbush blueberry plot. If you have not already began trapping and plan to do so, you should be putting out traps as soon as possible. 

The spotted wing Drosophilia is a critical pest because unlike most Drosophila species the spotted wing Drosophila infests ripe fruit, instead of rotting fruit. The fly causes damage by laying its egg in ripening fruit, where the larvae hatches and begins to feed. As the larvae feeds the fruit deteriorates rapidly, causing the fruit to become unmarketable. Because of this spotted wing Drosophila infestations can result in significant crop losses making monitoring and proper timing of controls crucial. The spotted wing Drosophila is a serious pest in many soft fruits, including: wild blueberries, highbush blueberries, strawberries (Day neutral and June bearing), raspberries, blackberries, cherries, peaches, plums, gooseberries, currants, grapes and a wide variety of wild and native fruits.


For more information on monitoring and control options please refer to Perennia's Highbush Blueberry Insect & Disease Management Schedule 2018 and factsheet on Monitoring for Spotted Wing Drosophila.

Mummy Berry 2018 Post #10

Friday, May 25, 2018

Based on scouting in the Annapolis Valley on Friday the majority of blueberry plants have begun to bloom, and apothecia cups have dried up and are no longer producing spores. As such, this will be the last mummy berry post of the 2018 season. 

This advisory, as with all previous recommendations are based on conditions observed in the Annapolis Valley. To ensure that you are no longer at risk of monilinia infection please continue to monitor fields, as there is considerable amount of variability across the province due to weather, varieties, plant development, etc...


Flower development from May 25,2018
Until next year, for more information on highbush blueberries, mummy berry, and sprays please refer to Highbush Blueberry Insect & Disease Management Schedule 2017 and  Management of Mummy Berry Disease in Highbush Blueberry.

Mummy Berry 2018 Post #9

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Based on scouting performed in the Annapolis Valley, the majority of plantings/varieties are beyond the risk of primary Monilinia infections at this point.  

Many plantings are at the prebloom stage with flowers beginning to emerge, and based on our observations spore cups appear to be dried up.  Given the advanced bud stage and declining spore cups, Monilinia infection periods have or will soon be coming to an end. There will be a final blog post confirming that the risk Monilinia infection is sufficiently diminished or past at the end of this week.



Bud stage from May 22, 2018




















Across most of Nova Scotia there was potential for infection on Sunday but it would be entirely site specific.  Those plantings that are still at the appropriate bud stage for infection would ahve been susceptible to Monilinia infection given the precipitation and average temperatures throughout the day Sunday.  It looks as though there is more rain in the forecast for Wednesday and Friday, so for those with plantings at later stages of development, you may want to consider a fungicide application.   

Before applying fungicides consider the in-field conditions, plant development, and history of Monilinia in the field as all these factor play a role in the occurrence of an infection period.  

For more information on highbush blueberries, mummy berry, and sprays please refer to Highbush Blueberry Insect & Disease Management Schedule 2017 and  Management of Mummy Berry Disease in Highbush Blueberry. 

Mummy Berry 2018 Post #8

Friday, May 18, 2018

From scouting done in the Annapolis Valley on May 18, 2018 buds are at the pre-bloom stage with some flowers beginning to emerge. It was also observed that spore cups are starting to dry up.  Although spore cups are starting to dry up there may still be a possibility of infection depending on field conditions, status of spore cups and plant development stage, so continue to monitor field conditions. 


Bud stage from May 18, 2018
The forecast for this weekend shows a possibility of precipitation, which could lead to an infection period. Monitor weather conditions in your area and consider applying fungicide if necessary. There will be another blog post early next week addressing the possible  infection period over the weekend. 

For more information on highbush blueberries, mummy berry, and sprays please refer to Highbush Blueberry Insect & Disease Management Schedule 2017 and  Management of Mummy Berry Disease in Highbush Blueberry.